Professional Development

Effective teachers commit to furthering their own learning as well as their students’ learning. Practicing educators take part in regular professional development opportunities in order to be effective and engaged teachers. The College of Education fosters this career-long commitment to learning and professional development by requiring our undergraduate students seeking initial licensure to complete a series of Professional Growth Units, or PGUs.

All undergraduate students in licensure majors who entered NC State in fall 2011 or later must complete a minimum of 4.5 PGUs prior to graduation. All MAT students must complete a minimum of 2 PGUs prior to graduation. It is recommended that all undergraduate students complete a minimum of 1.5 PGUs per year and MAT students complete a minimum of 1.0 PGU per year. You cannot complete all of your PGU requirements in one academic year.

The College holds a variety of professional development events each semester that offer PGU credit. Qualifying events lasting 45 minutes to one hour earn 0.5 PGU, with longer events earning additional PGU credit. The maximum number of PGUs a student can earn for a single event is 1.5. We expect students to have completed a variety of opportunties within their required PGUs. Therefore, attending the same PGU experience every year will not be accepted. For example, all PGUs coming from conference attendence will not be accepted.

This semester’s events are listed below.

Please check back frequently as new events will be listed as they become available.

PD 114 – edTPA, Writing Lesson Plans

In this session, we will discuss the requirements of the edTPA learning segment including, but not limited to: central focus, academic language, format of lesson plans, consideration of Tasks 2 and 3 in design, and inclusion of knowledge of students.

Thursday, January 19
5:30 – 7:00 pm
POE: 216
Instructor: Sarah Cannon
Credit: 0.5

PD 119 – edTPA Assessment

In this session, we will discuss Task 3, assessment. Specific topics include: how to design and assessment for edTPA, how to give feedback, and using assessment to guide further instruction.

Thursday, January 26
5:30 – 7:00 pm
POE: 216
Instructor: Sarah Cannon
Credit: 0.5

PD 120 – edTPA, Responding to and Understanding Commentary Prompts

This session is designed to help candidates break down the edTPA prompts to determine exactly what is being asked of them. We will discuss how to use this analysis to guide edTPA responses in all three task commentaries.

Thursday, February 9
5:30 – 7:00 pm
POE: 216
Instructor: Sarah Cannon
Credit: 0.5

PD 121 – edTPA, Planning to Video

In this session, we will discuss the requirements and rubrics for Task 2 and analyze sample videos and their effectiveness. Guests from METRC will address technical concerns of video.

Thursday, February 2nd
5:30 – 7:00 pm
POE 216
Instructor: Sarah Cannon
Credit: 0.5

PD 122 – Licensure application session

Learn the requirements and how to apply for your teaching license online in the new DPI Licensure System. Please select one of the sessions in SAGE.

Session 001: April, 18th, 6:00 – 8:00 pm
Session 002: April, 25th, 6:00 – 8:00 pm
Session 003: April, 24th, 1:00 – 2:00 pm
Session 004: April, 24th, 5:00 – 7:00 pm

POE 417
Audience: MAT and Undergrads who are graduating Spring or Summer 2017.
Instructor: Bonita Apperson
Credit: 0.5

PD 123 – edTPA Bootcamp

Do you want to participate in all of the edTPA sessions, but you just can’t commit so many evenings? If so, the edTPA Boot Camp is for you! At this session, we will discuss each task in detail, how to respond to commentary prompts, and will have special guest stars from METRC to answer your video questions. We will also provide space for you to start planning your portfolios with opportunities to “talk it out”. Come jump start your edTPA!

Saturday, February 4th
10:00 – 3:00 pm
POE tbd
Instructor: Sarah Cannon
Credit: 1.5

PD 321 – Breakout EDU

Have you played or heard of Escape Room games? Find out how this type of gaming can be used in education. Breakout EDU games teach critical thinking, teamwork, complex problem solving, and can be used in all content areas. We will hands on try out a breakout and look at Breakout EDU Digital.

February, 21st
3:30 – 4:30 pm
METRC
Audience: All students
Instructor/contact: Nathan Stevens
Credit: 0.5

PD 322 – Google Your Way to Being Organized

Using the Google calendar, Gmail, Chrome Extensions, Google Forms and more can make your life as a student and as a future teacher more efficient and organized. Join us at this PGU to learn advanced ways of using different features of the GSuite.

Wednesday, February 8th
3:30 – 4:30 pm
METRC
Audience: All students
Instructor/contact: Kerri Brown Parker
Credit: 0.5

PD 323 – Virtual Reality and Google Expeditions

Maybe you’ve heard about or used the Oculus Rift for gaming or heard about the ways in which virtual reality can change perspectives. Maybe you’ve seen one of the commercials with folks wearing funny looking glasses and in total awe of their experience! Come to this PGU to explore what we (and DH Hill) have available for Virtual Reality in education including Google Expeditions.

February, 7th
3:30 – 4:30 pm
METRC
Audience: All students
Instructor/contact: Kerri Brown Parker
Credit: 0.5

PD 324 – Learn to Solder as a Tool for Engagement

Learn to solder simple badges that can lead into other projects in your classroom. Passion-based education is about getting students reengaged back to the content using tools that they already like to use. I like to use tools that engage and could lead to careers for students. Engagement is all about hooks with students and this is one hook that will grab their attention.

March, 21st
3:30 – 4:30 pm
METRC
Audience: All students
Instructor/contact: Nathan Stevens
Credit: 0.5

PD 325 – “Textbooks” of the Future

Textbooks are becoming more and more obsolete as teachers and districts find content online that is more engaging and more relevant to their students. The state of NC hopes to end any dependence on textbooks in the near future. Are you ready to find, curate (collect/organize) and disseminate OER to your students? Let’s explore this world together and make sure you leave with possible online resources for your future classroom.

April, 4th
3:30 – 4:30 pm
METRC
Audience: All students
Instructor/contact: Kerri Brown Parker
Credit: 0.5

PD 326 – “Mobile Technologies and Your Classroom”

Are you ready to help kids learn in a BYOD classroom setting? How will you set up your room? What learning tools will you implement? How will you manage the different issue that come up with various mobile technologies. Hear success stories from different classrooms and different levels and create ways to think about implementing technology in a mobile world.

April, 18th
3:30 – 4:30 pm
METRC
Audience: All students
Instructor/contact: Kerri Brown Parker
Credit: 0.5

PD 327 – Social Media Literacy/LinkedIn Workshop for Future Education Professionals

This PGU will provide an overview of social media literacy for education professionals. The session will cover tips and tools of social media etiquette and how to develop a professional LinkedIn as an educator. In conclusion of this course, the students will have an increased knowledge around maintaining professional social media boundaries, utilizing social media in the classroom, and the importance of developing a LinkedIn page

Monday, February 20
6:00 – 7:00 pm
POE 512
Audience: Undergraduate students
Instructor/contact: Brittany Hayes
Credit: 0.5

PD 531 – Still Endangered: Black Males Answering the Call to Teach in NC Public Schools

Based on the school to prison pipeline that has garnered a great amount of attention in the past decade, many studies have underscored the need for Black male teacher presence in schools. However, not much beyond rhetoric has taken place to change educational policy or practices. Dr. Shekina Moore will specifically share findings from her qualitative study that provided a better understanding of what attracted Black male teachers to education, what factors motivated them to join and how they were recruited to the teaching profession. This session will invite students, practitioners, and faculty to engage in discourse around Black male teacher recruitment strategies.

Tuesday, February 7th
12:00 – 1:30 pm
POE 512
Audience: graduate students, faculty, undergraduate students
Instructor/contact: Regina Gavin Williams
Credit: 1.0

PD 532 – Choice Not Chance Documentary Screening

As Mothers, Angela Morrow and Mindy Fuller could see the vast potential in their sons and their peers. When they talked to young men, they witnessed intelligent, articulate, engaging men with promising futures. But for too many young men of color, their life stories were not playing out in positive ways. Mindy and Angela wanted to help, but how could they without knowing why young men were making the choices they were making.

Please join the College of Education and the Women’s Center for a screening of “Choice Not Chance”. This documentary gives nine amazing young men from differing socioeconomic backgrounds a platform to tell us all what is behind their choices. In the film, they discuss the determining factors, consequences, and outcomes of choice versus chance. What causes young men to make bad choices and what factors are present in those who make good ones? This documentary screening will be followed by a brief question and answer session with the filmmakers.

For more information, please visit: http://www.choicenotchancedoc.com/

Thursday, February 2nd
6:00 – 8:00
Witherspoon Student Center 126
Audience: undergraduate students, graduate students, faculty, staff
Instructor/contact: Regina Gavin Williams
Credit: 1.0

PD 535 – Teaching, Supporting and Advocating for Children Who Are Immigrants or Refugees

In this new political era, what do we, as educators and school counselors, need to know about the legal rights of children who are immigrants or refugees? What are our roles and responsibilities? What strategies can we utilize to ensure that our students feel safe and welcome in our schools and classrooms? Join a panel of legal and educational experts as we discuss these and other important issues.

Tuesday, February 21st
6:00 – 7:30 pm
Park Shops 200
Audience: Future teachers, future counselors, faculty
Instructor/contact: Ann Harrington
Credit: 0.5

PD 536 – The Light in Her Eyes Film Screening

The Women’s Center, in partnership with the Muslim Students’ Association and the College of Education are co-sponsoring a screening of the 2011 film, “The Light in Her Eyes” on March 29th 2017 at 6:30pm in the Women’s Center on the 4th floor of Talley. This event is part of the Women’s Center’s Intersections Film Series which explores intersecting identities, with a focus on gender related social justice issues, through a variety of highly praised and thought provoking films. There will be a short discussion after the film, in addition to free popcorn!

The film features Houda al-Habash, a conservative Muslim preacher, who founded a Qur’an school for girls in Damascus 30 years ago. Every summer, her female students immerse themselves in a rigorous study of Islam. A surprising cultural shift is under way—women are claiming space within the mosque. Shot right before the uprising in Syria erupted, The Light in Her Eyes offers an extraordinary portrait of a leader who challenges the women of her community to live according to Islam, without giving up their dreams. SOURCE: http://thelightinhereyesmovie.com/about/

Wednesday, March 29th
6:30 – 8:30 pm
Talley Student Union: Women’s Center
Audience: Open to all students
Contact/Instructor: Tyra Kornegay
Credits: 1.0

PD 619 – Designing Classrooms to Maximize Student Achievement

With starting your first class, open house, meet the teacher upon us it is time to think about how your classroom looks like. That first impression really sets the tone for the rest of the school year. In this workshop we will look at:
* First impressions of classrooms
* What to do with the walls in your classroom
* How to arrange furniture
* Tips for a welcoming classroom environment

Wednesday, April 5th
12:00 – 1:00 pm
POE 120
Instructor/contact: Kirsten Hoeflaken
Audience: All CED Students
Credits: 0.5

PD 620 – How to Create an Socially and Emotionally Safe Classroom

To feel emotionally safe in a classroom is crucial for learning. Students can only learn optimal when it’s safe in a classroom. The challenge is how to create an emotionally safe environment in your classroom? In this workshop I will give you some tools and information to start the year of well. Of course, this is a topic that runs far and deep, with many avenues that can be explored. But even this handful of ideas can help transform the emotional environment of a classroom. If you want to learn more please bring your lunch to this presentation.

Wednesday, February 22nd
3:30 – 4:30 pm
POE 120
Instructor/contact: Kirsten Hoeflaken
Audience: All CED students
Credits: 0.5

PD 621 – Cooperative learning ideas for your classroom

We all learned about cooperative learning and how effective it is for learning. In this workshop you get some cooperative exercises/ideas that you can use in your future classroom. I will share with you some exercises from my experience as an elementary teacher for more than 20 years. Things we will discuss are:
– class builders and team builders
– memorize exercises
– class organizers
– group discussions

Thursday, March 23rd
12:00 – 1:30
POE 120
Instructor/contact: Kirsten Hoeflaken
Audience: All CED Students
Credits: 1.0

PD 639 – NC Agriculture Teachers Association fall inservice meetings

Participants will attend a fall NCATA regional inservice meeting to interact with agriculture teachers, learn about updates to agricultural education curriculum, and participate in professional association business and activities.

March 22nd
1:00 – 4:00 pm
Location: Various
Instructor/contact: Travis Park
Audience: Agricultural Education students
Credits: 0.5

PD 645 – Engaging Students in Agriscience Applications

We will provide training and curriculum materials, along with teacher practice, for engaging activities to incorporate into the NC Agriscience Applications (freshman level) curriculum.

Thursday, February 16th
5:00 – 8:00 pm
Ricks Hall 118
Audience: Agricultural education and related contents
Instructor/contact: Travis Park
Credits: 1.0

PD 646 – Advocacy for Middle School Youth

This PGU will focus on a particular aspect of working with middle school students, particularly those at-risk.

Monday, April 3rd
5:30 – 6:30 pm
POE 120
Audience: Any undergrad CED students.
Instructor/contact: Robin McWilliams
Credits: 0.5

PD 647 – Energy Expo

Energy Expo: Kids and Families explore energy together. Join us in doing hands on circuits and energy investigations with kids at Marbles Kids Museum. Families will build circuits and create helicopters, door bells as well as race solar cars. Join us in engaging kids of all ages in science and engineering activities.

Saturday, January 28th
12:00 – 3:30 pm
Marbles Kids Museum
Audience: All CED Undergraduate or MAT students
Instructor/contact: Dr. Gail Jones
Credits: 1.5

PD 648 – NanoDays 2017

NanoDays is an annual event that introduces K-12 students and their teachers to advancements in nanotechnology. Join us in sponsoring hands on activities, demonstrations, and laboratory tours.

Two events:
section 001: Thursday, April 13th
11:00 – 4:00 pm
and
section 002: Friday, April 21st
1:00 – 5:00 pm

NCSU Campus
Audience: middle and high school teachers and students
Instructor/contact: Dr. Gail Jones
Credits: 1.5

PD 649 – Receiving & Processing Feedback in a Professional Setting

In this PGU session we focuses on:

– Why feedback is important
– Growth through self awareness
– Resiliency as a valued quality
– Skills related to how to process feedback in a productive way

Tuesday, April 4th
5:30 – 6:30 pm
POE 512
Audience: undergraduate students
Instructor/contact: Audrey Fulton
Credit: 0.5

PD 650 – Equity vs Excellence: A False Dichotomy in Science and Society

Dr. Sylvester Jim Gates, Jr. is coming to NC State to give the 2017 College of Humanities and Social Sciences’ Diversity Lecture on “Equity vs Excellence: A False Dichotomy in Science and Society”.

A Distinguished University Professor, University System of Maryland Regents Professor and John S. Toll Professor of Physics at the University of Maryland, Dr. Gates is a theoretical physicist, who among other things, contributed to an Amicus Brief respectfully submitted to the Supreme Court of the United States of America on October 15, 2015. His American Academy of Arts & Sciences (AAAS) essay led to the question that Chief Justice Roberts asked, “What unique perspective does a minority student bring to a physics class?” during the oral argument in the Fisher v Texas case in December 2015. Dr. Gates is known for his pioneering work in supersymmetry and supergravity, areas closely related to string theory. The author of more than 200 research papers and a member of the National Academy of Sciences, Gates has been featured in dozens of video documentaries, including five in 2015. For his contribution to science and research, he received the National Medal of Science from President Obama in 2013. Gates serves on the U.S. President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology, the National Commission on Forensic Science, and the Maryland State Board of Education. He was awarded the “2016 Arts and Sciences Advocacy Award” by the Council of College of Arts and Sciences.

Thursday, February 9th
6:00 – 7:30 pm
Talley Student Center, 3285
Audience: all students
Instructor/contact: Dr. Juliana Makuchi Nfah-Abbenyi
Credit: 1.0

PD 653 – Role Models and Representation

The Multicultural Young Educators Network (MYEN) and the NC State Women’s Center would like to invite you to our program, Role Models and Representation. This panel presentation will consist of Black women educators who will lead a discussion about the importance of positive role models and representation in our communities and in the media.

Panelists include:
Alexandria Pitts- Middle Grades Teacher & NC State Alumna ’15
Dr. Kimberly Stansbury- Associate Professor and MSW Program Director, NC State University
Roxann J. Sykes- Assistant Principal, Washington GT Magnet Elementary
Alexandra Zagbayou- Executive Director, Student U

Wednesday, February 15
6:00 – 7:30 pm
Park Shops 210
Audience: undergraduate students, MAT students, faculty/staff, graduate
students
Instructor/contact: Regina Gavin Williams
Credit: 0.5

PD 654 – Supporting and Advocating for Children Who Have Parents Who Are Incarcerated

In the United States, 1 in 28 children have a parent in prison. The children of incarcerated adults are immeasurably affected and often experience trauma from the conditions occurring prior to incarceration as well as their family member’s absence. The stress and loss can affect children’s day to day interactions, particularly in classroom settings. Melissa Radcliff, our guest speaker, will provide information about identifying and supporting children with parents or guardians in prison.

Tuesday, March 14th
6:00 – 7:30 pm
Park Shops 200
Audience: Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, & Seniors
Instructor/contact: Sara Bowmen
Credit: 1.0

PD 655 – Advocating for Girls in STEM

This event will be based around women in STEM and why it’s important for educators to promote women in STEM fields and education. We will discuss facts/statistics about women in STEM fields, why women have been historically underrepresented in these fields, women who have made noteworthy strides in these fields, and why it’s important for educators to promote women and girls in STEM.

Wednesday, March 15th
6:00 – 7:00 pm
POE 228
Audience: All CED students
Instructor/contact: Sydney Levine
Credit: 0.5

PD 656 – Panel Discussion with Juniors & Seniors

A panel discussion with JR’s and SR’s will allow sophomore students the opportunity to ask questions and interact with upper-class man; providing them with the chance to discuss “what to expect” during their junior and senior years.

Tuesday, April 11th
5:30 – 6:30 pm
POE 512
Audience: Sophomore students
Instructor/contact: Audrey Fulton
Credit: 0.5

PD 657 – Who’s In Charge: Why Teachers Adopt A Controlling Motivating Style and How They Can Become More Autonomy Supportive

In this interactive session, presenters and participants will engage in synergistic discussions on a practical issue that pertains to classroom teachers regardless of the subject they teach: nurturing, supporting and increasing students’ inner endorsement of classroom activities (also referred to as autonomy support; Reeve & Jang). Providing students with a sense of autonomy is important because autonomy supportive teachers nurture students’ inner motivational resources and create new opportunities for those students to grow. Often times they experience meaningful benefits themselves including an increased sense of personal accomplishment and less emotional exhaustion from teaching. During this interactive workshop we will highlight what it means to be truly autonomy supportive and how to resist the urge to use controlling instructional practices. This session concludes with a panel discussion focused on opportunities to conduct practice-relevant motivation research as an undergraduates at NC State.

Monday, April 10th
6:00 – 7:30 pm
Park Shops 215
Audience: Undergraduate students
Instructor/contact: Alexa DeFalco
Credit: 1.0

PD 659 – Live with Bill Cowher, a conversation with the former Pittsburgh Steelers coach.

Join Coach Bill Cowher, a 1979 graduate of the NC State College of Education, as he shares what he has learned about teaching, coaching, and leading during his career as an NFL player, coach, and studio analyst. Professor Lee Stiff will interview Coach Cowher followed by a time for Q&A between students and Coach Cowher.

About Coach Cowher: Bill Cowher is a studio analyst for CBS’ “The NFL Today” and the former Pittsburgh Steelers head coach who led the team to two Super Bowls, including winning Super Bowl XL in 2006. He is also a former captain and MVP linebacker on the NC State football team and graduated from the College of Education in 1979.

Monday, April 3rd
4:00 – 5:00 pm
Park Shops 210
Audience: Open for College of education students and invited guests only.
Registration: Limited seating. Register to attend and receive 0.5 PGU credits <https://docs.google.com/a/ncsu.edu/forms/d/1gLhNYGJ08VU_wJNOb7tCEozTIFq3kgeU_UL4n9qEqcY>
Contact: Dr. Anona Smith Williams
Credit: 0.5

PD 819 – MathCounts

MathCounts is a national math enrichment, coaching, and competition program that increases enthusiasm for and enhances achievement in middle school mathematics throughout the United States. Students gather at Athens Drive High School and compete to solve mathematical problems.

Saturday, February 11th
8:30 am -12:30 pm
Location: Athens Drive High school
Audience: This event is geared to anyone interested in working with middle
school or high school math students!
Instructor/contact: Angela Wiseman
Credit: 1.0

PD 831 – NCCTM- Developing students’ mathematics identity

How do you see your self as a learner and doer of mathematics? How does your mathematics identity shape how you engage in school mathematics? In this session, we will use vignettes of real students to talk about students’ mathematics identity and how it relates to motivation, engagement, and issues of access and equity.

Tuesday, April 18th
7:30 – 8:30 pm
POE 320
Audience: ELM, MAT, and MED majors
Instructor/contact: Cyndi Edgington
Credits: 0.5

PD 833 – NCCTM: Using Apps in the Math Classroom

Diana Chen, a teacher from Panther Creek High School, will be joining us to talk about integrating various education apps in the math classroom! This will be a meeting where you can try out all of the apps, so please bring your own device if possible. We’ll look at apps such as ClassKick, Desmos, A Little Calculus, ReCap, Doceri/Educreations/ShowMe, Remind, Google Forms, Smart Seat, CamScanner and more math apps!

Tuesday, Janaury 24th
7:30 – 8:30 pm
POE 320
Audience: All education majors
Instructor/contact: Cyndi Edgington
Credit: 0.5

PD 834 – NCCTM: Tracking in Mathematics Classrooms

Tracking, the practice of placing students in separate classes that provide higher or lower-level content to students, is common in US middle and high schools. Dr. Valerie Faulkner will talk with us about the implications for tracking on students opportunities to engage in high quality mathematics instruction and other issues of equity and access in mathematics education.

Tuesday, February 21st
7:30 – 8:30 pm
POE 320
Audience: MED, ELM, MAT majors
Contact/instructor: Cyndi Edgington
Credit: 0.5

PD 835 – Addressing Current Bias as Future Educators

The focus of this program is to explore and discuss our current bias as future educators. MYEN and SNCAE will engage in an interactive hidden bias tests as Tremaine Brittain facilitates a healthy discussion of race, gender and socioeconomic bias.

Tuesday, February 28th
6:30 – 7:30 pm
POE 512
Audience: Undergraduate students
Instructor/contact: Brittney Craven
Credit: 0.5

PD 836 – Putting Privilege into Perspective

Join MYEN for a Diversity Education Week: Revisited program, Putting Privilege into Perspective! Attendees will engage in a privilege walk to highlight the differences in the levels of privilege experienced by each of us. This will be followed by a brief discussion about how privilege and poverty affects students in the classroom. Following the privilege walk, attendees will participate in a group activity that will allow them to experience varying levels of privilege that they might not be familiar with. The program will end with tips on how teachers can use this information in their classrooms to make sure that their students are receiving the most inclusive education possible.

Wednesday, March 22nd
6:00 – 7:30 pm
POE 120
Audience: Freshman, Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors
Instructor/contact: Chantal Warfield (MYEN)
Credit: 1.0

PD 850 – NCCTM Mini-Conference

NCCTM is pleased to host our annual mini-conference. Participants sign up to prepare a poster presentation on their favorite math task. You will gain professional presentation experience, get feedback on your task, and get new ideas to use in your future math classroom. Awards are given for each grade band and math strand. Spots are limited so sign up today!

Tuesday, February 7th
6:00 – 8:00 pm
POE Hall Atrium
Audience: ELM, EMS, and MAT students
Instructor/contact: Cyndi Edgington
Credit: 1.5

 

Register through SAGE