Counselor Education Graduate Student Whitney McLaughlin Has Been Named a Finalist for Three Minute Thesis

finalists seated

Come out and support our finalists as they compete in the 5th annual Three Minute Thesis on Oct. 29. Ten graduate students representing five NC State colleges will compete for cash prizes as they share their research project in just three minutes.

Three Minute Thesis, an international competition, challenges graduate students to share their research in three minutes with one slide. The finalists were chosen during preliminary rounds held Oct. 8-10.

The 3MT finals will be held in the Hunt Library’s Duke Energy Center, 3-5 p.m. on Oct. 29 with a reception to follow for the finalists and their guests. Tom Stafford, vice chancellor for student affairs emeritus, will be master of ceremonies for the event.

Colleagues and students are encouraged to turn out to support the finalists and learn about their research. Audience members will vote for a “People’s Choice” winner, while a panel of judges will choose first and second place winners.

The 10 finalists, along with their degree programs, are listed below by college.

Agriculture and Life Sciences

  • Reny Mathew, entomology and plant pathology

Education

  • Whitney McLaughlin, counselor education

Engineering

  • Parth Chansoria, industrial and systems engineering
  • Elvin Hossen, civil, construction and environmental engineering
  • Hafizul Islam, industrial and systems engineering
  • Taylor Neumann, chemical and biomolecular engineering
  • Francisco Jativa, civil, construction and environmental engineering

Humanities and Social Sciences

  • Angela Wilhite, English

Textiles

  • Javier Jimenez, textile engineering, chemistry and science
  • Adhiraj Shinde, thermal protection and comfort center

The Three Minute Thesis is free and open to the public. Locate the Hunt Library and nearby parking on this map.

Three Minute Thesis is an academic research communication competition developed by the University of Queensland, Australia.

This post was originally published in The Graduate School News.