John Lee

Title

Associate Professor

Department/Program Affiliations

Program(s): 
CICE
Middle Grades Education
New Literacies and Global Learning
Social Studies Education

Contact Information

Email: 
Phone: 
919.513.0126
Mailing Address: 
Campus Box 7801 Raleigh, NC 27695-7801
Office: 
402D Poe Hall
John Lee's picture

Curriculum Vitae

Curriculum Vitae: 

John Lee is Associate Professor of Social Studies Education at North Carolina State University. His scholarly work focuses on standards and the uses of digital historical resources in teaching and learning as well as efforts to theorize and develop tools related to new literacies. He was an author of the College, Career and Civic Life Framework for Standards in Social Studies (socialstudies.org/c3) and is co-director of the C3 Teachers project (c3teachers.org). He is part of the leadership team for the Microsoft Technology Enrichment Initiative (pil-tei.com/). He is co-director of the New Literacies Collaborative (newlit.org) and develops innovative digital historical resources through the Digital History and Pedagogy Project (dhpp.org). He is author of the book Visualizing Elementary Social Studies Methods and co-author of Research on Technology in Social Studies; and Guiding Learning with Technology. John is currently the co-Chair of the Teacher Education Council of the Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education

Education

Education: 
Ph.D., University of Virginia
Ed.S. / M.Ed., Georgia State University
B.A., University of Georgia

Research

Educational Research Areas: 
Research focuses on the development and use of pedagogically practical digital historical resources and on developing an understanding of how teachers reason pedagogically when using digital historical resources. This work includes designing digital histo
Current Research Projects: 
Digital History and Pedagogy Project - http://dhpp.org
New Literacies Collaborative – http://www.newlit.org
Plantation Letters Project – http://.plantationletters.com
Research Description: 

Dr. Lee is an Associate Professor of social studies education in the Middle Grades Program of the Department of Curriculum, Instruction & Counselor Education (CICE). Dr. Lee is interested in teaching and scholarship related to social studies and history teachers’ knowledge of how to teach in an active and engaging manner using electronic resources. Currently, he is researching best design practices for online collections of historical resources targeted for K-12 classrooms. Dr. Lee is involved in educational standards development, and is a member of the writing team for the College, Career, and Civic Life: Framework for Social Studies State Standards. He is also interested in social media and technologies as well as new literacies for social studies and history. 

Courses Taught

Professional Presentations & Publications

Professional Presentations & Publications: 

Hicks, D. vanHover, S., Yeager, E. L., & Lee, J. K. (accepted for publication). Internet literacies for active citizenship and democratic life: In search of the intersection. (pp.  ). In W. B. Russell (Ed.). Contemporary Social Studies.

The term “technology in schools” has often been viewed as an educational panacea in which students would be able to learn (almost) in spite of their teacher, and countless school reform measures have been suggested (or mandated) that advocate “state of the art” technology (see Friedman & Hicks, 2006). State of the art technology has evolved from radio and motion pictures to television, microcomputers, educational software, static web pages, and currently, Web 2.0 technologies that foster interaction and communication. For each new development, there has been a parallel prediction that its use would revolutionize teaching and learning in social studies education (see Christensen, Johnson, & Horn, 2008; Gardner, 2009). However, the promises and potential of technology have not materialized (Cuban, 2001; Martorella, 1998).

Lee, J. K., & Spires, H. A. (2009). What students think about technology and academic engagement in school: Implications for middle grades teaching and learning. AACE Journal, 17(2). 

Spires, H. A., Lee, J. K., Turner, K. A., & Johnson, J. (2008). Having our say: Middle grade student perspectives on school, technologies, and academic engagement. Journal of Research on Technology in Education 40(4), 497-515. 

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